Le labo Yergeau
News
2018-02-08
Welcome to Ruth Schmidt!

Ruth just joined the lab as a postdoctoral research associate. She has graduated from Wageningen University under the supervision of Paolina Garbeva and Wietse de Boer. Her thesis was entitled "Volatile communication between fungi and bacteria". Picture and project in the people section.

2018-01-15
Welcome to Asmaâ Agoussar!

We are super happy that Asmaâ has decided to continue with Le Labo Yergeau as a PhD student. Picture and project in the people section.

2017-10-25
Welcome to Asmaâ Agoussar!

Asmaâ is our new fall intern. Picture and project will be soon available in the people section.

2017-05-04
An award for Étienne!

Étienne is to receive the 2017 Canadian Society for Microbiology Fisher Scientific Award. This award is given to promising young Canadian investigators in the field of microbiology. 

2017-05-01
Welcome (again) to Charlotte Giard-Laliberté!

We are very happy that Charlotte has decided to continue with us for her M.Sc. See picture and project descriptions in the people section.

2017-01-15
New project funded!

Étienne is the lead researcher on a NSERC Strategic grant that was recently funded ($707K). This project will look at the wheat holobiont, trying to find ways to rapidly adapt it to drought stresses. We will be hiring two new PhD students to work on the project. Click here to see the advertisement.

2017-01-09
Welcome to Charlotte Giard-Laliberté!

Charlotte is our new winter intern. See picture and project descriptions in the people section.

2016-10-20
Welcome to Sara Correa Garcia and Pranav Pande!

Sara and Pranav has just joined the lab for their Ph.D. See pictures and project descriptions in the people section.

2016-06-23
The field experiments have started!

The whole team worked very hard to put in place two experiments in our campus experimental field. One experiment will look at the effect of drought on the wheat microbiome and the other at the effects of cultivar diversity on soil diversity. 

2016-06-01
Welcome to Itumeleng Moroenyane!

Itu has just joined the lab for his Ph.D. after a M.Sc. at the Seoul National University. See his picture and project description in the people section.

2016-05-02
Welcome to the summer interns!

Éloïse Adam-Granger, Deanna Chinnerman and Karelle Rheault have join the lab for  summer internships. 

2016-05-02
Welcome back Liliana!

Liliana just came back from maternity leave, ready to do awesome science again! 

2016-04-21
Marking our experimental field!

The institute has granted us some land to put in place an experimental field. Etienne and the gang went to measure and delineate the field. Site preparation and experimental set-up to start soon!

2016-02-22
Welcome to Hamed Azarbad!

Hamed just joined the lab as a postdoctoral fellow. Photo, bio and project description to come soon in the people section!

2016-01-21
It starts to look like a lab!

The NRC-Montreal has generously lend us equipment and colleagues at IAF are also very generous!

2016-01-17
Welcome to Usman Irshad and Simon Desmeules!

Usman just joined the lab as a postdoctoral fellow and Simon is a M.Sc. student. Photos and project description to come soon!

2016-01-05
Le Labo Yergeau is officially opened!

Étienne has officially started at the IAF. New students and post-doc to join this week. More students to join later.

2015-09-18
The lab is moving!

Étienne was recruited by the Institut Armand-Frappier and the lab will be moving there in January. We will have several fully-funded grad. students positions available. 







Recent publications

The willow root and rhizosphere interactome


Phytoremediation using willows is thought to be a sustainable alternative to traditional remediation techniques involving excavation, transport, and landfilling. However, the complexity of the interaction between the willow and its associated highly diverse microbial communities makes the optimization of phytoremediation very difficult. Here, we have sequenced the rhizosphere metatranscriptome of four willow species and the plant root metatranscriptome for two willow species growing in petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated and non-contaminated soils on a former petroleum refinery site. Significant differences in the abundance of transcripts related to different bacterial and fungal taxa were observed between willow species, mostly in contaminated soils. When comparing transcript abundance in contaminated vs. non-contaminated soil for each willow species individually, transcripts for many microbial taxa and functions were significantly more abundant in contaminated rhizosphere soil for Salixeriocephala, S. miyabeana and S.purpurea, in contrast to what was observed in the rhizosphere of S. caprea. This agrees with the previously reported sensitivity of S. caprea to contamination, and the superior tolerance of S. miyabeana and S. purpurea to soil contamination at that site. The root metatranscriptomes of two species were compared and revealed that plants transcripts are mainly influenced by willow species, while microbial transcripts mainly responded to contamination. A comparison of the rhizosphere and root metatranscriptomes in the S. purpurea species revealed a complete reorganization of the linkages between root and rhizosphere pathways when comparing willows growing in contaminated and non-contaminated soils, mainly because of large shifts in the rhizosphere metatranscriptome.

Oil sand exploitation effects on aspen and its microbiome


Application of chemical dispersants to oil spills in the marine environment is a common practice to disperse oil into the water column and stimulate oil biodegradation by increasing its bioavailability to indigenous bacteria capable of naturally metabolizing hydrocarbons. In the context of a spill event, the biodegradation of crude oil and gas condensate off eastern Canada is an essential component of a response strategy. In laboratory experiments, we simulated conditions similar to an oil spill with and without the addition of chemical dispersant under both winter and summer conditions and evaluated the natural attenuation potential for hydrocarbons in near-surface sea water from the vicinity of crude oil and natural gas production facilities off eastern Canada. Chemical analyses were performed to determine hydrocarbon degradation rates, and metagenome binning combined with metatranscriptomics was used to reconstruct abundant bacterial genomes and estimate their oil degradation gene abundance and activity. Our results show important and rapid structural shifts in microbial populations in all three different oil production sites examined following exposure to oil, oil with dispersant and dispersant alone. We found that the addition of dispersant to crude oil enhanced oil degradation rates and favored the abundance and expression of oil-degrading genes from a Thalassolituus sp. (that is, metagenome bin) that harbors multiple alkane hydroxylase (alkB) gene copies. We propose that this member of the Oceanospirillales group would be an important oil degrader when oil spills are treated with dispersant

MG and MT of oil degradation in seawater


Application of chemical dispersants to oil spills in the marine environment is a common practice to disperse oil into the water column and stimulate oil biodegradation by increasing its bioavailability to indigenous bacteria capable of naturally metabolizing hydrocarbons. In the context of a spill event, the biodegradation of crude oil and gas condensate off eastern Canada is an essential component of a response strategy. In laboratory experiments, we simulated conditions similar to an oil spill with and without the addition of chemical dispersant under both winter and summer conditions and evaluated the natural attenuation potential for hydrocarbons in near-surface sea water from the vicinity of crude oil and natural gas production facilities off eastern Canada. Chemical analyses were performed to determine hydrocarbon degradation rates, and metagenome binning combined with metatranscriptomics was used to reconstruct abundant bacterial genomes and estimate their oil degradation gene abundance and activity. Our results show important and rapid structural shifts in microbial populations in all three different oil production sites examined following exposure to oil, oil with dispersant and dispersant alone. We found that the addition of dispersant to crude oil enhanced oil degradation rates and favored the abundance and expression of oil-degrading genes from a Thalassolituus sp. (that is, metagenome bin) that harbors multiple alkane hydroxylase (alkB) gene copies. We propose that this member of the Oceanospirillales group would be an important oil degrader when oil spills are treated with dispersant


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Etienne Yergeau,
Jan 25, 2016, 11:35 AM
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